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Are Cell Phones Really That Bad?

are cell phones really that bad

These days, adults aren’t the only ones with phones. In fact, many parents give their cell phones to infants to provide a portable entertainment option. So, with all those mobile devices, we ask the question: Are cell phones really that bad, and should we be concerned about the health risks?

Are Cell Phones Really That Bad?

Smartphones emit a high level of radiation and holding one in your pocket or bra is extremely risky to reproductive organs and breasts. These are five health risks posed by cell phones:

Cancer Risk

A recent study from Sweden suggests decades of cell phone use can triple your chances of getting brain cancer. While even a tripled risk is low you might say, this latest study contradicts the studies from 2010 (funded in part by cellphone manufacturers) that found no strong link between cell phone use and brain tumours.

Hinders Sleep

It’s been found that smartphones might even affect your sleep, with the latest evidence suggesting that people with smartphones in the bedroom sleep less each night.

Negatively Affects Children

Microwave radiation from cell phones poses a much higher risk to children than originally thought. One study noted a child’s brain tissue and bone marrow actually absorbs significantly more radiation than those of an adult.

Promotes Social and Psychological Issues

A team of researchers found cell phones actually interfere with normal socialization. The near constant use even creates learned compulsive behaviours. With the average young adult sending around 100 text messages and checking their phone a little over 60 times per day – even when they haven’t received a message or notification, the fear is this type of behaviour opens the door to potentially dangerous addictions and anti-social behaviour.

What Can You Do to Protect Yourself?

Cell phones expose you to a great deal of radiation, and your best bet for protecting your brain is to reduce the number of conversations you are having on the phone. Use speakerphone or earphones when you’re at home or driving, and rather use text messaging whenever you can.